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Meeting the First Philistine

Once Caleb Huse boarded the vessel, enroute to Europe, he endeavored his hardest to remain as clandestine as possible. After ensuring his bags were secure, Huse meandered out to the main-deck, trying to remain as secretive as possible. There was also another individual at the railing - which he quickly recognized as a Yankee supporter: Caleb Cushing. Both men were well acquainted with each other. Cushing stopped him and said:

"Good Morning, Mr. Huse. You are with the south, l understand?After the curt greetings, Huse asked the man's opinion on the chances the South had in winning the conflict. Cushing seemed to bristle and answered:

"What chance CAN they have?! The money is all in the North. The manufactures are all in the North. The ships are all in the North. The arms and arsenals are all in the North. The arsenals of Europe are within ten days of New York, and they will be open to the United States government and closed to the South. Southern ports will be blockaded. What possible chances CAN the South have?"

It was then, after the alarming bluntness of Cushing that Huse looked Cushing square in the eyes, lifted his hat, and declared:

"Good Morning, Mr. Cushing."

The disturbing encounter troubled Huse, as he began to change his itinerary & "hire" one of his traveling companions from Baltimore to take his luggage the rest of the way to Liverpool.

There was no reason to draw additional, unwarranted attention by dragging traveling baggage through the streets.

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